Salt City Hoops » David J Smith http://saltcityhoops.com The ESPN TrueHoop Utah Jazz Site Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:06:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 The ESPN TrueHoop Utah Jazz Site Salt City Hoops no The ESPN TrueHoop Utah Jazz Site Salt City Hoops » David J Smith http://saltcityhoops.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://saltcityhoops.com What If: the Utah Jazz had kept Donyell Marshall? http://saltcityhoops.com/what-if-the-utah-jazz-had-kept-donyell-marshall/ http://saltcityhoops.com/what-if-the-utah-jazz-had-kept-donyell-marshall/#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 18:06:40 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12663 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Associated Press

Associated Press

Pondering the “what ifs” in sports can be painful and unhealthy. But like so many things in life that are painful and unhealthy, we do it. We spent time analyzing, scrutinizing, occasionally obsessing on what might have been. You know you do it. Feel free to admit to it. And there is no shame in it. It is a natural part of fandom, and the Utah Jazz faithful are not immune to that.

With this in mind, this is the first in a mini series (not to be confused with a miniseries) of posts, highlighting some of the “what ifs” in the franchise history. Some will be obvious–think the 1997 and 1998 NBA Finals squads–and others will be less so.

Without further ado, what if the Utah Jazz had managed to keep Donyell Marshall long-term?

Donyell Marshall was an interesting blend of size, athleticism and sheer basketball talent coming out of the University of Connecticut. When he was tabbed as the fourth pick in the 1994 NBA Draft by the lowly Minnesota Timberwolves, hope was high. Marshall was having a nice rookie campaign, averaging 10.8 PPG and 4.9 RPG for the Timberwolves. But when the chance to obtain forward Tom Gugliotta emerged, Minnesota pounced on it, shipping Marshall to the Golden State Warriors. It’s not too often a high lottery pick gets shipped out his rookie year.

Marshall went on to play five+ seasons for the Warriors. He struggled mightily his first two years in the Bay Area, but something clicked in the 1997-98 season. Marshall became a focal point of the team’s schemes and he produced 15.4 PPG and 8.6 RPG. Two years later, he was a double-double guy for the Dubs, posting 14.2 PPG and 10.0 RPG. But the Warriors were a mess, constantly changing coaches and perennially missing the postseason.

Enter the Utah Jazz. The team had reached an impasse with excellent back-up point guard, Howard Eisley. Eisley had been a terrific find for the team and as all know, he was a integral cog for those Finals teams. His role grew and some could see him being John Stockton’s successor. But given the Hall of Famer’s remarkable longevity, conditioning and ability to play through injuries–even as he got older–left Eisley wanting a bit more. He wanted to go to the Dallas Mavericks, where he would have a chance to compete for a starting role.

The Jazz joined forces to complete a tricky, complex four-team trade. From Utah’s perspective, it was essentially shipping out Eisley, Adam Keefe (whose role had diminished greatly) and a late first-round pick for Marshall and something called Bruno Sundov.

It was an exciting acquisition for the Jazz. At 27 years old, Marshall was just entering the prime of his career. He added hope to the Utah front court, with his ability to play both forward positions. He was effective equally as a starter or key player off the bench. Marshall’s rebounding acumen and he long, wiry frame added a lot to the mix. He became a very good complement to Karl Malone up front. Marshall played with enthusiasm and injectd some much needed youth and energy to an aging team trying to remain contenders in the NBA landscape.

His seasons in Utah were somewhat underrated. Marshall averaged 13.6 PPG, 7.0 RPG his first year in Salt Lake City, adding in a steal and a blocked shot. The advanced stats tell the story–19.9 PER, .568 TS% and a very good 8.5 WS–third best on the squad behind a pair of greats. The following season, Marshall brought 14.8 PPG and 7.6 RPG and while the advanced numbers were not quite as good, they were still impressive (19.2 PER, 5.0 WS).

In the summer of 2002, Marshall became a free agent. The Utah Jazz wanted him back, but the two sides were apart in terms of the money. Maybe there were other issues less known to the public, but who knows? Marshall decided to ink with the Chicago Bulls for less money that he was demanding from Utah. He only lasted one year in the Windy City before being traded. He went on to play with a number of teams–Toronto, Cleveland, Seattle and Philadelphia. He enjoyed his best season in 2004, averaging 16.2 PPG and 10.7 RPG for the Raptors. Marshall enjoyed a long, 15-year NBA career.

What did the Jazz miss out on? Marshall brought a unique talent to the table and it was hard to replace that. He was still young enough that he could have been a big part of any post-Stockton and Malone teams. A Marshall and Andrei Kirilenko tandem could have been interesting to see–long, athletic and quite good on both ends of the court. Add in Greg Ostertag and you’d have an interesting group. Marshall also became a prolific 3-point shooter, something Utah needed. It is not a stretch to think that Marshall could’ve been a double-double guy in Utah.

Instead the Jazz signed Matt Harpring to fill Marshall’s shoes. Harpring was a stalwart player for the Jazz (his first year in Utah was quite good–good enough that he had some All-Star mentions). He added a different dynamic. Still, it seemed like Marshall had more upside, and thanks to his size and versatility, may have addressed a greater need. Who knows what could’ve been had they been able to agree on a contract.

So, there’s our first “what if’ scenario.  While there are many more that will be addressed in subsequent posts, feel free to leave a comment with some of the “what ifs” that you’ve had. After all, it is part of being a Utah Jazz fan.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Utah Jazz Roster Additions: Dee Bost, Kevin Murphy, and Jack Cooley http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-roster-additions-dee-bost-kevin-murphy-and-jack-cooley/ http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-roster-additions-dee-bost-kevin-murphy-and-jack-cooley/#comments Thu, 21 Aug 2014 19:25:03 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12607 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE

Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE

While training camp is still several weeks away, the Utah Jazz roster is starting to materialize quickly. In the past week, three names have emerged: point guard Dee Bost, shooting guard Kevin Murphy and forward Jack Cooley. Who are these players and realistically, what are their chances of making the regular season roster? Let’s take a look.

Dee Bost, 6’2″, 176 lbs, 24 years old, Rookie

Bost is perhaps the most intriguing, because it is known that he has a modest guarantee ($65,000 this year) built-in to his three-year pact. That is not known yet with Murphy or Cooley.  He showed consistent improvement during his four seasons at Mississippi State, tallying 15.8 PPG and 5.5 APG as a senior and All-SEC first team performer. Bost went undrafted in 2012. He encountered some trouble–a 14-game NCAA suspension as a result of not withdrawing properly from the 2010 NBA Draft, along with some academic issues.

Bost is an all-around player, as displayed in college and thus far in his professional career. This is evidenced by his stat-stuffing numbers last year in the D-League: 15.2 PPG, 6.1 RPG and 8.4 APG, along with 2.1 SPG. His shooting was less stellar–just 36.2 percent from the floor and 29.3 percent from beyond the arc (on 7 attempts per outing). He was an D-League All-Star with the Idaho Stampede and earned All-Defensive team honors, as well. While his wingspan (6’3.25″) is not eye-opening, he seems to have a propensity for playing the passing lanes.

He played summer league for the Portland Trailblazers in 2012 and inked a deal with them in 2013, only to be waived during the preseason.  Bost spent time overseas the past two seasons. He most recently toiled for the Indiana Pacers’ summer entry (5.8 PPG, 2.2 APG).

Kevin Murphy, 6’6″, 185 lbs, 24 years old, 2nd season

While the Jazz have not made a formal announcement, several sources indicate the guard will be in the fold for training camp. Murphy is clearly a familiar face, being the franchise’s lone draft pick in 2012 (47th pick). The Tennessee Tech product struggled in his lone NBA season, earning only 52 total minutes (0.9 PPG). Murphy was shipped out to the Golden State Warriors in the asset-accumulating move that netted Richard Jefferson, Brandon Rush and Andris Biedrins, along with a bevy of draft picks. He was promptly waived and then spent a spell in France.

After that, Murphy tore it up with the Idaho Stampede of the D-League last season. Displaying some impressive shooting (48 percent field goals, 38.6 percent 3s and 85.1 percent on free throws), Murphy averaged 25.5 PPG, good for second behind Pierre Jackson. After notching a 50-point game in college, he bested that with a 51-point explosion for Idaho (this included a league-record 21 made field goals).

Jack Cooley, 6’9″, 246 lbs, 23 years old, Rookie

Cooley is someone that Utah has had its eye on the past year. The Jazz had him in both for pre-draft workouts and as part of free agent mini camps. The bruising forward showed steady improvement at Notre Dame, averaging a 13.1 PPG/10.1 RPG double-double senior year. Despite the All-Big East first team accolades, he too went undrafted.

The bruising forward spent time with both the Houston Rockets and Memphis Grizzlies’ summer league teams. From some accounts, Cooley had received a lot of attention from NBA teams, some of whom presented some partially guaranteed contracts. He opted to play in Turkey last season and is giving the NBA another try.

With 13 players with contracts for the 2014-2015 season and forward Brock Motum, this trio brings the Jazz training camp roster up to 17. Utah will undoubtedly invite the maximum number of players possible, seeing as it gives them a close look at individuals they like.

What are the chances for these three?

The Jazz will most likely be adding a third point guard and Bost will compete for that role (Ian Clark may also get a good look here). Of the threesome of free agents, he may have the best chance.

The swingmen and power forward spots are already seemingly stocked, so it may be even more of an uphill battle for Murphy and Cooley. If Murphy is to stick, it will be because of improvement from his last Jazz stint and his ability to make shots. With Clark and Carrick Felix already on the roster, this may be a challenge. With the front court depth, Cooley will be fighting with Brock Motum for a final roster spot.

With the Jazz uniting with the Idaho Stampede this offseason, any training camp cuts could find themselves with a roster spot in Boise. While the team traditionally keeps one vacant spot for flexibility’s sake, if they like players, it would not be surprising to see a full roster with 15 guys. Likewise, if any of the  invitees impresses, it is not beyond reason for the Jazz to cut someone with guaranteed money or make a trade as necessary.

As has been mentioned often, Utah’s front office does its homework on players and only invites players who they are intrigued with–players who might provide some healthy competition for a roster spot.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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A History of Left-Handed Utah Jazz Players http://saltcityhoops.com/a-history-of-left-handed-utah-jazz-players/ http://saltcityhoops.com/a-history-of-left-handed-utah-jazz-players/#comments Wed, 13 Aug 2014 17:48:42 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12542 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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this-day-05-13

Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images

In case you were not aware, August 13th is officially Left-Handers Day. With that in mind, and because it is also interesting to review Jazz history,  it seems fitting that Salt City Hoops takes a look back at Utah’s southpaws.

According to Basketball Reference, there have been 17 left-handed players in franchise history:

Mark Eaton: Eaton could be one of the most improbable stories in NBA history. A bit player at UCLA, he was working as the world’s tallest auto mechanic when Jazz coach Frank Layden discovered him. Through hard work, Eaton became an absolute defensive force. A two-time Defensive Player of the Year (with five All-Defensive team honors along the way), the 7’4″ center paced the NBA in blocked shots four times. He posted an NBA record with 456 swats (5.56 BPG) in 1984-85 and finished with a league-best 3.5 BPG career mark. Eaton also made one All-Star team and had his #53 retired by the Jazz. Injuries hampered the twilight of his career, but he did not miss more than three games in any of his 10 first seasons. And in the historic 1988 second-round series, Eaton gave Kareem Abdul-Jabbar fits. Not bad for a left-handed center taken in the fourth round.

C.J. Miles: Miles is sometimes maligned among Jazz fans, as there seemed to be untapped potential in the athletic, talented swingman. In fairness to him, it should be remembered that Miles was a second-round pick drafted right out of high school. Miles was a classic streaky shooter. There were outings like his 40-point performance in 2011. There were also games where he shot himself out of the game. All in all, Miles gave Utah seven solid seasons and will be asked to step up in Indiana in wake of Paul George’s injury.

John Crotty: Crotty spent five seasons backing-up John Stockton over two stints. While his first three years were so-so, his return to Utah was much more productive (6.9 PPG, 3.4 APG with some great shooting numbers in 2001-02). The lefty was a crafty player who, as a solid locker room presence, went from undrafted rookie to 11-year career.

Freddie Boyd: The little-known guard toiled for three seasons in New Orleans, having his best campaign in 1977 (9.9 PPG, 3.1 APG).

Gail Goodrich: The five-time All-Star and former All-NBA guard finished a nice career with the New Orleans Jazz, signing as a free agent in 1976. While injuries and age were factors, Goodrich had three nice seasons, posting 16.1 PPG and 4.8 APG in 1977-78.

Stephen Howard: Another “two-timing” Jazz player, Howard was a surprisingly productive player in his sparse playing time. He was the 12th man on the memorable 1997 NBA Finals squad.

Allan Bristow: An all-around utility player, Bristow had a pair of solid seasons in an Utah uniform. In 1979-80, he put up 11.6 PPG, 6.2 RPG and 4.2 APG for the Jazz.  “Disco” also played one year in the ABA. Bristow went on to coach the entertaining, early 1990s Charlotte Hornets squads that featured Larry Johnson and Muggsy  Bogues.

James Donaldson: The former Dallas Mavericks stalwart and former All-Star spent his final two years with the Jazz, signing twice as insurance for the injured Eaton and Felton Spencer. At 37 years old, he even started for Utah his final year.

Carl Nicks: Nicks backed up Rickey Green for two seasons, averaging 7.4 PPG but just 1.1 APG in 16.5 MPG in 1981-82.

Derek Fisher: Much has been said about Fisher’s departure from the Jazz, but he was a heady influence on a young  team that made it to the Western Conference Finals. He was acquired from the Golden State Warriors for a song (Andre Owens, Devin Brown and Keith McLeod). In an interesting move, Jerry Sloan opted to start the 6’1″ Fisher at shooting guard alongside Deron Williams. His numbers were not stellar (10.1 PPG on 38% FGs and 3o% 3s), but he added another playmaker who could hold his own defensively. And his game 2 effort versus the Warriors is among the most memorable moments in Jazz history.

Calbert Cheaney: Cheaney was another in a long-line of vets the Jazz signed in hopes of keeping the Stockton/Malone teams in contention. The left-handed spent just one year with Utah as the starting shooting guard. He was unspectacular, averaging just 8.6 PPG in 29.0 MPG (and just 4.4 PPG in the Playoffs).

There were several other southpaws who spent just one season with Utah, including Andris Biedrins last year (the others: Keon Clark, Todd Fuller, Brooks Thompson, Aaron Williams, Terry Furlow and Neal Walk).

Utah adds one more left-hander this year in rookie Rodney Hood. Hood’s stealthy play in summer league has Jazz faithful excited about his potential to be an impactful player for years to come.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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The Utah Jazz Search for a Third Point Guard http://saltcityhoops.com/the-utah-jazz-search-for-a-third-point-guard/ http://saltcityhoops.com/the-utah-jazz-search-for-a-third-point-guard/#comments Wed, 06 Aug 2014 20:43:28 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12445 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Photo: Anthony J. Causi

Photo: Anthony J. Causi, NY Post

The Utah Jazz always carry three point guards on the roster. That is one of the constant constants with this organization, going back to the dawn of time. With the team guaranteeing combo guard Ian Clark’s deal for the 2014-2015 season, the team now has 13 players under contract. Even with that move, it sounds like they hope to still add a third point guard. Now, if Clark can show he can fill that role, this becomes a moot point. But the jury’s still out on that front.

What point guards are out there? Here’s a quick rundown of some remaining free agents and guys who may be available in the trade market. As one can imagine, the names are anything but glamorous. Then again, neither is this role.

Pablo Prigioni: According to ESPN’s Marc Stein, Prigioni may be available. The New York Knicks have changed things up at the point guard position, adding Jose Calderon and Shane Larkin. Prigioni is a pure point guard, as evidenced by his assists to field goal attempt ratio (228 dimes to 191 FGAs). Ditto for his 25.6 AST% and 9.3 USG%. He is an excellent marksman when he does shoot, posting .642 TS% and .631 eFG%. He is a very good 3-point shooter who rarely gets to the free throw line. Prigioni is owed $1.66M this year and is partially guaranteed in 2015-2016 for $290,000. He might be obtainable for very little– a second-round pick. At last check, Utah has an abundance of those coming up. Sometimes it’s hard to remember that Prigioni is 37-years old, given that he’s only played two seasons in the NBA. That would make him almost the same age as Trey Burke and Dante Exum combined.

Toure’ Murry: Murry was rumored to be someone Utah is considering. His body of work is meager, as he played just 7.3 MPG in 51 games for the New York Knicks as a rookie. He only attempted 12 3-pointers in 373 total minutes. This is where the Jazz scouting department probably plays a factor. Perhaps Murry impressed them over the past few years.

Ramon Sessions: Sessions had a nice season (12.3 PPG and 4.1 APG, including 15.8 and 4.8 with the Milwaukee Bucks) and it’s frankly a surprise that he has not been picked up yet. Given his productivity and age (hard to believe he is just 27 years old), he most likely would be looking for more minutes than he could get in Utah.

Jordan Crawford: Another unlikely Jazz target. Crawford has the reputation of a gunner–he’s never been shy at hoisting shots up. He did show he can dish the ball, registering 5.7 APG for the Boston Celtics in Rajon Rondo’s absence. Given his youth and the ability he’s shown to put points on the board, he’ll be looking for a team in need of bench production.

Toney Douglas: Douglas quickly became a journeyman, toiled for five different franchises the past three seasons (part of three trades during that span). He started his career with the reputation of a shooter, but he has been wildly inconsistent from long distance. Douglas hit just 27.9 percent with the Miami Heat, which is not good given the open looks he got there. He is decent defensively and as a playmaker.

Tyshawn Taylor: Taylor received spot minutes behind Deron Williams in Brooklyn the past two seasons. He is a solid facilitator (21.4% AST%), but is horrendous offensively otherwise (.427 TS% and .357 eFG%).

Chauncey Billups: The long-time veteran and former Finals MVP is winding down what could be a Hall of Fame career. He showed he did not have much in the tank last season in his return to Detroit. Sadly, he has only played 61 total games the past three years. At 37, if he decides to try for one more season, it will likely be with a contender.

Earl Watson: Watson too is finishing up a solid career and was a fan favorite during his three seasons with the Jazz. He inked with the Portland Trailblazers to play the mentor role and only appeared in 24 games. As a player who is familiar with the environs, is a consummate pro and would not chafe in this role, Watson might be a good fit.

Ronnie Price: Yet another popular former Jazz guard. Price also went the “veteran presence in the locker room” route, playing just 31 games.  He was never a shooter (career 37.8 percent from the field and just 29.2 percent beyond the arc). Price does work hard defensively and exudes hustle , but may have lost a bit of his quickness since his time in Utah.

Leandro Barbosa: A midyear signing by the Phoenix Suns, Barbosa showed he still had some game (7.5 PPG in 18.4 MPG). He still possesses some speed, but as a combo guard, has never been a true play maker.

The Jazz could also bring in some undrafted rookies to compete in training camp, as David Locke has mentioned. There may be others who have been playing overseas or in the D-League that have Utah’s eye.

While NBA and Jazz fans certainly find themselves mired in the doldrums of the NBA offseason, this is something to watch over the next several weeks.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Who is Brock Motum? http://saltcityhoops.com/who-is-brock-motum/ http://saltcityhoops.com/who-is-brock-motum/#comments Thu, 31 Jul 2014 22:41:28 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12395 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images AsiaPac

Lintao Zhang/Getty Images AsiaPac

When the Utah Jazz summer league roster was made public, most people scanned right past Brock Motum’s name, focusing naturally on the returning players and recent draftees. A month later, people are much more familiar with the Australian forward.

Motum was very solid in Las Vegas, averaging 8.0 PPG (62.1 percent from the field), 4.6 RPG and 1.6 APG in 17.2 MPG (16.7, 9.6 and 3.3 per 36 minutes). Against the Milwaukee Bucks, he posted 16 points and six rebounds and two games later, he added 14 and 8. Motum hustled, functioned well within the system, made the right basketball plays and showed a penchant for making the extra pass–something that is clearly a focus for Utah Jazz basketball going forward. Motum showed solid athleticism and played with poise.

Motum’s efforts not only caught the eyes of the fanbase, but apparently the front office and coaching staff. Motum’s reportedly accepted the invitation to participate in Utah’s training camp this fall. This interview gives some insights into Motum’s experience at summer league.

So, who is Brock Motum? Hailing from Brisbane, the 6’10″, 245 lb forward’s life has been centered around basketball. He trained for two years at the Australian Institute of Sport, which has seen many other future NBA hoopsters grace its courts . Motum then went on to play four years for Washington State, displaying improvement each season. While his senior campaign was impressive (18.7 ppg, 6.3 rpg), his junior year was even better when glancing at the advanced stats (25.3 PER, .626 TS%, 4.7 WS).

Despite a solid collegiate career, Motum went unclaimed in the 2013 NBA Draft. After suiting up for the Philadelphia 76ers in summer league, he signed a two-year deal with Granarolo Bologna in Italy. Reports indicate he has an contractual out if an opportunity in the NBA arises. He also joins Dante Exum as a member of Airbnb Australian Boomers Team that will represent at the 2014 FIBA Basketball World Cup. His familiarity with Utah’s prized rookie would help should Motum make the Jazz roster.

With the recent trade with the Cleveland Cavaliers that jettisoned forwards Malcolm Thomas and Erik Murphy and guard John Lucas III back east, Motum’s chances improved a bit. While all three were non-guaranteed deals, Thomas and Murphy still signified front court competition for Motum. Utah is clearly stacked with Derrick Favors, Enes Kanter, Rudy Gobert, Trevor Booker, Steve Novak and Jeremy Evans, so it will be tough. But Motum’s camp can take solace in the fact that Utah had seven bigs in tow for most of the season .

Besides Gordon Hayward and Exum, Jazz fans should keep an eye on Motum during this international tournament. Likewise, he’ll be one to also watch come October’s training camp.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Making the Case for Malcolm Thomas http://saltcityhoops.com/making-the-case-for-malcolm-thomas/ http://saltcityhoops.com/making-the-case-for-malcolm-thomas/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 22:45:39 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12273 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports

Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports

Slowly, but surely, the Utah Jazz roster is getting filled. With Washington Wizards free agent Trevor Booker agreeing to a two-year, $10 million pact with the team on Tuesday, the headcount sits at 11 guaranteed contracts.

Moreover, the front court is getting more and more crowded. With Derrick Favors, Enes Kanter, Rudy Gobert, recently acquired Steve Novak, Jeremy Evans and now Booker in tow, things are taking shape.

But don’t sleep on Malcolm Thomas.

Thomas is having a very solid showing at the Las Vegas summer league. He has started all three outings thus far, posting very solid numbers: 11.3 PPG (56 percent shooting), 7.7 RPG, 1.7 APG, 1.33 BPG and 1.0 SPG in 23.7 MPG. He has been active on both ends of the court. Thomas’ energy and a double-double helped offset Gobert’s absence versus the Denver Nuggets Tuesday evening. All in all, it could be argued that he has been Utah’s most consistent performer.

Thomas has had an interesting road. He spent time at three schools in California–Pepperdine University, San Diego Community College and San Diego State University. While he had a nice collegiate career at SDSU, he went undrafted in 2011. After brief spells in South Korea, with the Los Angeles Lakers (getting cut prior to the start of the lockout season) and the D-League, he was signed to contracts with both the San Antonio Spurs and the Houston Rockets, ultimately spending most of this rookie season in the D-League.

He spent most of the 2012-13 campaign with Maccabi Tel Aviv. He then earned 10-day contracts with the Golden State Warriors and the Chicago Bulls, finishing that season with them. Finally, after two months in a second San Antonio stint, he was waived and claimed off waivers by the Jazz . Thomas only appeared in seven games. He had nine points and four rebounds in the season finale . Thomas has appeared in a grand total of 23 NBA games (135 minutes) and has enjoyed a cup of coffee with six different teams in three years.

So, why does he make sense for Utah going forward? Thomas actually brings a lot of skills to the table. He is athletic and has a good motor. Thomas has good size and agility that might allow him to play both forward positions. Very similar to counterpart Jazz forward Jeremy Evans, he is a quick jumper, using that his advantage on the glass (especially offensive boards). Thomas is a willing defender, using his length and wingspan to disrupt things. He has good time when blocking shots, especially off the weak side. Lastly, he can stick the jumper–even extending out to 3-point range .

Thomas would be in line for just $948K. Given his long, winding road, he is hungry to make a name for himself – something that is evident in the way he is playing for the Jazz. He has upside and could be a guy at the end of the bench that can continue to work on his game. In short, he’s a very low-risk, potential solid-reward type of move.

With shooting and defense being premiums, as stated often by general manager Dennis Lindsey and head coach Quin Snyder, Malcolm Thomas has every chance to find himself donning a Utah Jazz uniform come regular season tip-off.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Utah Jazz Summer League Roster Rundown http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-summer-league-roster-rundown/ http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-summer-league-roster-rundown/#comments Fri, 11 Jul 2014 23:22:59 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12204 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Michelle Tessier, Deseret News

Michelle Tessier, Deseret News

As the nearly 10,000 in attendance could attest, there was an excitement in the air at the Utah Jazz’s open practice and scrimmage. Certainly, most of the enthusiasm was directed toward Trey Burke, Rudy Gobert and 2014 Draft picks Dante Exum and Rodney Hood. People were also eager to see what Ian Clark, Malcolm Thomas and Erik Murphy have to offer. The same will be true for Utah’s entry into the Las Vegas Summer League.

Besides the players with an NBA contract above, there are five other players on that roster. While they may be warm bodies for camp, there are some interesting names. Here’s brief primer for those who will be donning Jazz uniforms the next week.

CHRIS ROBERTS, guard, 6’4″, 205 lbs: Roberts is a somewhat familiar face, having played on the 2013 Utah Jazz summer roster. It could be argued that he was the most consistent performer last year, but decided to take the guaranteed deal in Italy. Roberts plays with a lot of energy on both sides of the court and can hit the mid-range jumper, as well as beyond the arc. He is someone to keep an eye on, as the team seems to enjoy his game.

NICK COVINGTON, guard, 6’2″, 200 lbs: Covington is a Weber State product who has spent the past three seasons in the D-League. His stats there were nothing special: 8.6 PPG on just 39.4 percent shooting. He can knock down the 3-pointer. Covington is modest as a facilitator and lacks the size to play shooting guard. The Jazz seem to like him, as he was listed on last year’s training camp roster, but he had to bow out due to injury. It should be noticed that, in the open practice scrimmage, Covington played with the squad that featured the players with contracts.

BROCK MOTUM, forward, 6’10″, 245 lbs: The forward had a nice career at Washington State, averaging 18.7 PPG and 6.3 RPG his senior campaign. He went undrafted and spent the year in Italy. Motum has bulked up a bit since college and has a nice touch. Like Exum, he hails from Australia. He showed some solid hustle in the scrimmage.

NIELS GIFFEY, swingman, 6’7″, 205 lbs: The German shooter adds to the international flair of the summer league roster. He contributed to two NCAA championships at Connecticut–one in 2011 and the other in 2014. He is a surprising invite, as he averaged a modest 8.4 PPG and 3,8 RPG last year. But he did shoot 61.3 percent from the floor, including 48.3 percent from downtown. The result were stellar  .688 TS% and .676 eFG%. Slight of build, Giffey looked a bit overmatched Thursday, but played the passing lanes well.

JASON WASHBURN, center, 7’0″, 245 lbs: Yet another familiar face from his time with the University of Utah. Washburn had a pre-draft workout last season and then spent the season in Belgium. Washburn plays with a lot of energy and was quite aggressive during the intrasquad game. 

 

Given the strength of the summer league roster, there is a high likelihood that most of these players will get limited playing time. Perhaps one will earn an invitation to training camp, or the Jazz will discover a surprise. There’s always that chance and knowing Utah’s scouts have done their homework, there’s probably good reason these players were brought in for these few weeks.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Experts’ Take on the Utah Jazz’s Draft http://saltcityhoops.com/experts-take-on-the-utah-jazzs-draft/ http://saltcityhoops.com/experts-take-on-the-utah-jazzs-draft/#comments Fri, 27 Jun 2014 21:24:03 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12043 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Photo Courtesy of Fansided

Photo Courtesy of Fansided

For the second year in a row, Utah Jazz GM Dennis Lindsey and his fellow front office cohorts had a stellar NBA Draft night. In 2013, Lindsey’s first at the helm, he brokered three trades that netted All-Rookie point guard Trey Burke, the potential-filled Rudy Gobert and a nice playmaking prospect in Raul Neto. It was an exciting night for the Utah fan base.

Then came last night. As my colleague Dan Clayton, who was on the ground at the Barclay Center, summed up so well, it was an exemplary evening for the Jazz–one that could be integral both in the present and going forward. Guard Dante Exum and swingman Rodney Hood are now officially Utah Jazzmen. Based on the reaction at EnergySolutions Arena and on the Jazz Twitter and Google+ communities, the response from the team’s supporters is overwhelming positive. There is a feeling of optimism,a welcome one after a long, sometimes trying season for all.

So, what are the experts saying? Because we can now retire–at least for a season–the mock draft roundup, let’s take one look at how the Jazz’s evening is being viewed.

ESPN 

Chad Ford really earns his keep each year, especially as the Draft draws closer and closer. His live pick-by-pick analysis is always enjoyable to watch as the selections are made. When the Jazz picked Exum, here was his take:

Exum is a huge win for the Jazz. They needed a potential franchise player, and I think they got him. He’s so quick, so fast and has such great size for his position. He can play with Trey Burke, or he can, and likely will, eventually take Burke’s starting job. It’s so hard for the Jazz to lure elite talent. I think they got one here.

Regarding Hood’s selection:

This is turning into a great night for the Jazz. They were praying Exum would fall to them, then hoped Hood would drop to them at No. 23. They wanted a big shooter who could play two positions, and that’s what they got in Hood. The Jazz were devastated when they fell out of the top three on lottery night. But this draft should make Jazz fans feel really good.

When Ford doled out his grades (Insider), Utah came away as honor students with an A. Per his sources, Exum was ranked third on Utah’s draft board, while Hood was 15th. Ford goes on to suggest that Burke and Exum will team up together, but that he could see the latter taking the former’s starting position. He finishes by saying, “I know Jazz fans will feel like this draft wasn’t a home run without Jabari Parker. But it was at least a triple, and given where they were drafting, that’s an A in my book.”

CBS Sports

This site is effusive in their praise for the Jazz’s Draft Night. Zach Harper took a look at each of the Western Conference teams, issuing them a grade. He one-upped Ford by giving Utah an A+, saying “I’m not sure the Utah Jazz could have had a better draft.”  He envisions a guard line that can be interchangeable, with Alec Burks factoring heavily into the equation. Harper also says that Hood is “another lottery-level talent who fell too far.” He, like a few other media members, suggests that Hood is good insurance should the Jazz opt to part ways with Gordon Hayward. That does not seem likely given their cap situation, and it seems safe to say that Hayward will be brought back. 

James Herbert included Hood as one of the steals of the draft, saying it is “hard to believe [he] fell this far.” He adds that “Hood is versatile, skilled, smart and has the kind of game that should translate well immediately.” This has to make Jazz fans excited.

Sports Illustrated

Ben Golliver delved into the winners and losers and includes Burke as being one of the night’s losers due to Exum’s arrival on the scene. While Golliver thinks it can work out for a while, he surmises that “one wonders whether push will come to shove and the Jazz will have to pick between the two players.” He does say that Hood will “have the chance to compete for big minutes on a rebuilding team from day one, while playing for another former Blue Devil in coach Quin Snyder.” 

USA Today

Adi Joseph gave his take in another pick-by-pick instant analysis. He was cautiously optimistic about Exum, saying “Utah had bigger needs” but those went out the door when Exum slid to the Jazz. He added that Exum “also has tremendous value on the trade market,” but it seems safe to say that Utah did not draft him to use in another deal. Exum earned an A-.

Joseph was a big fan of Hood’s pick, saying the Jazz were able to draft both the best available player and the best player to fill the team’s needs. Describing him as a “mix of Rashard Lewis and Danny Granger,” he thinks Hood will be an excellent fit in Utah, who had “a great draft.”

Real GM

Jonathan Tjarks takes a look at each team and had a lot of positive things to say about Utah. He says that outside of Joel Embiid, “Exum has the best chance of any player in the draft of being a two-way star.”  He also says that even though the Jazz have drafted behind the Orlando Magic, he’d “rather have an Exum/Burke backcourt than [Victor] Oladipo/[Elfrid] Payton.” Tjarks asserts that the draft may make Burks and Enes Kanter expendable.

A number of other outlets will continue to provide their analysis of the Draft, but this provides a sampling. The media seems to view Utah’s haul very positively, while bringing up appropriate questions about players roles, rotational battles and offseason movement. Fair enough. There are still lots to be determined as the team enters into free agency and trade season.

But today, thanks to an exhilarating Draft night, the outlook for the Utah Jazz looks bright and exciting.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Due Diligence: The Utah Jazz’s Free Agent Mini-Camp http://saltcityhoops.com/due-diligence-the-utah-jazzs-free-agent-mini-camp/ http://saltcityhoops.com/due-diligence-the-utah-jazzs-free-agent-mini-camp/#comments Tue, 10 Jun 2014 22:53:50 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=11840 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Free agent guard Darius Morris going against now Jazz guard Diante Garrett;    James McDonald/Getty Images

Free agent guard Darius Morris going against now Jazz guard Diante Garrett;
James McDonald/Getty Images

The Utah Jazz announced that they will host a mini-camp for free agent players this week, June 10-12. If you remember, the team did the same thing last season; it seems like it’s something that’s going to be a consistent Dennis Lindsey move.

It doesn’t seem that newsworthy, but there are a number of positives behind holding such a camp. First, one never knows if there is a diamond in the rough just waiting to be found. Whether it is for summer league, training camp, or an emergency 10-day contract guy, having this number of free agents work out for the team breeds some familiarity. Similarly, you might find someone who fits the mold of a mini reclamation project–someone who may not have been given a chance or who has not taken advantage of the chances he’s had thus far. Lastly, perhaps an invite to a player is a favor to an agent–something agents will remember when their other clients potentially deal with the franchise down the line.

There are a number of interesting names among these 27 invitees. Here are a few that stand out a bit:

Darius Morris, guard, 6’5″, 195 lbs: Morris is one of the more recognizable names on the list. A tall point guard with size, Morris is a three-year veteran who was drafted in the second round by the Los Angeles Lakers in 2011. Morris spent two seasons with LA, having an okay second season (4.0 PPG, 1.6 APG in 14.2 MPG). He wore three different uniforms last year–having a cup of coffee in Philadelphia (6.9 PPG, 2.6 APG), Memphis and with the Clippers. He was Trey Burke’s point guard predecessor at Michigan.

Orlando Johnson, guard, 6’5″, 220 lbs: Johnson was a 2012 second-round pick (36th pick) fo rthe Sacramento Kings, who was subsequently traded to the Indiana Pacers. He had a decent rookie campaign (4.0 PPG, 2.2 RPG in 12.1 MPG). Due to increased Pacers depth, his playing time dipped and he was waived when Indiana traded for Evan Turner and LaVoy Allen. The Kings picked him up for a brief stint, too. Johnson appeared in 12 postseason games with Indiana.

Tyler Honeycutt, forward, 6’8″, 198 lbs: Also a second-round pick by Sacramento (in 2011), Honeycutt has two years of NBA experience–with the Kings and the Houston Rockets. He most recently played in Israel. He is still just 23 years old.

Jack Cooley, forward, 6’9″, 246 lbs: This bruiser out of Notre Dame worked out a few times for the Jazz last year–once pre-draft and once during the summer. He was rumored to have received partially guaranteed offers from multiple NBA teams, but turned them down for for a deal in Turkey. Several teams have expressed interest in him this go-around.

James Nunnally, swingman, 6’7″, 205 lbs: Nunnally also worked out for Utah last year and spent time with both the Sixers and the Hawks last season, averaging 3.4 PPG and 1.5 RPG in 12.7 MPG. He is a long, athletic player who might be worth keeping an eye on.

Tim Ohlbrecht, center, 6’11″, 255 lbs: This German big man went undrafted in 2010, but managed to earn a contract with the Houston Rockets in 2013. He appeared in three games with Houston and was picked up by Philadelphia, before they waived in in last year’s training camp.

Carlon Brown, guard 6’5″, 215 lbs: Brown spent three seasons at the University of Utah before finishing up at Colorado. He has spent the last two years in the D-League and in Israel.

Jason Washburn, center, 6’10″, 242 lbs: Another familiar face from his time with the University of Utah. Washburn had a pre-draft workout last season and then spent the season in Belgium.

Nick Covington, guard, 6’2″: The former Weber State guard was invited to the Jazz’s training camp, but was a late scratch in favor of Lester Hudson.

Ahmad Nivins, forward, 6’9″, 242 lbs: He was a 2009 second-round pick by the Dallas Mavericks, but he’s not yet made an NBA roster.

Several others such as Dee Bost, John Shurna, Chris Kramer, Trent Lockett, Mitchell Watt and Courtney Fells have played in NBA summer leagues or have attended NBA training camps.

The roster may not do much for people, but these are names that could fill out rosters for summer league or with the Jazz’s new D-League affiliate, the Idaho Stampede. Perhaps there is a Wesley Matthews in this group: a player who will find himself in training camp, battling for a roster position.

If anything, it is exciting to see the Jazz be so thorough and exhaustive in their efforts. They are doing their due diligence and it will pay off down the line.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Utah Jazz Mock Draft Roundup 6.0 http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-mock-draft-roundup-6-0/ http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-mock-draft-roundup-6-0/#comments Thu, 05 Jun 2014 18:39:31 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=11766 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Adam Hunger USA TODAY Sports

Adam Hunger USA TODAY Sports

Strange to believe, but the NBA Draft is just three weeks away. What once seemed like it was ages away is now quickly approaching. Without further ado, here is the latest mock draft round up and which each of the sites has the Utah Jazz taking.

ESPN Mock Draft 3.0 (Insider), by Jeff Goodman (updated 05.29)

While Draft guru Chad Ford has not updated his Mock Draft 6.0 in the past two weeks, Jeff Goodman has. Goodman has the Jazz going with Julius Randle at #5 over Noah Vonleh, citing the assumption that Randle has the ability to “bring a toughness and physical presence from the outset” and that he “could coexist with guys such as Derrick Favorsand/or Enes Kanter up front.” At #23, UCLA’s Kyle Anderson is the pick, explaining how he would help Trey Burke facilitate the offense.

Ford did update his Big Board 11.0 (Insider) and inserted a few Utah Jazz mentions:

  • He said he doesn’t see guard Dante Exum getting past Utah at #5.
  • According to Ford, #5 is also forward Aaron Gordon’s ceiling.
  • He feels guard Zach LaVine’s range ends with the Jazz’s #23 pick.
  • Utah is a “real option’” for Latvian big man Kristaps Porzingis with its second first-round pick.

Sports Illustrated Mock Draft, by Chris Mannix (updated 06.04)

In a scenario (which has gained more steam with his positive workouts), many prognosticators see the Orlando Magic opting for guard Marcus Smart, someone they were rumored to love in the 2013 Draft before he withdrew. Mannix is among that group, as he sees Orlando going with the fiery player at #4. This is something Utah fans would love to see realized, as it would obviously mean one of the top four prospects would drop to #5. In this mock, Mannix has Exum coming to Utah, calling him “a great consolation prize” for missing out on Jabari Parker. He also adds that a “Burke-Exum backcourt could become a dynamic duo.” Cleathony Early is Mannix’s pick at #23, saying he could be a steal should he prove to play small forward at the NBA level.

Draft Express Mock Draft, by Jonathan Givony

Surprisingly no changes on this site, with Utah picked to select Marcus Smart, Kyle Anderson and center Isaiah Austin.

NBA Draft.net Mock Draft (updated 06.04)

This particular mock brings in an interesting mix of players to the Jazz: #5 forward Noah Vonleh, #23 forward Adreian Payne and #35 KJ McDaniels. This trio would add a great deal of shooting, athleticism and basketball talent. Vonleh is a guy who is wowing NBA scouts and front offices with his workouts. Should Utah be unable to move up or should none of that much-touted quartet fall, Vonleh seems to have the most upside. Payne and McDaniels would be steals should they drop to the Jazz’s latter two picks.

CBS Sports Mock Drafts (updated as recently as 06.04)

Gary Parish, Zach Harper and Matt Moore provide their updates, along with a look into the second round. Parish predicts Vonleh, McDaniels and Burke’s college teammate Mitch McGary. Harper goes with Randle, Early and Serbian swingman Bogdan Bogdanovic. Both fun scenarios to ponder, but it’s Moore’s that sticks out. He sees Vonleh moving up the ranks to #3, thus allowing Jabari Parker to slide to #5. Add in guards Elfrid Payton and Jordan Clarkson and Utah fans would be celebrating Christmas in June. Plausible? Not very likely. Still enjoyable to think about, at least momentarily.

Yahoo! Mock Draft, by Marc Spears (updated 05.20)

Another that has remained static. Marc Spears thinks Aaron Gordon and Kyle Anderson would add versatility to Utah’s roster.

Basketball Insiders Mock Draft (updated 06.04)

Basketball Insiders offers a four-f0r-one mock deal, bringing predictions from four of their writers. Alex Kennedy, Joel Bingham, Steve Kyler and Yannis Koutroupis vary between Randle, Gordon and Smart with the fifth pick and three of the four see Jerami Grant being Utah’s guy with the 23rd. Names like Spencer Dinwiddie, Glenn Robinson and Johnny O’Bryant are the choices in the second round.

Sheridan Hoops Mock Draft (updated 06.03)

Joe Kotoch of Sheridan Hoops thinks Vonleh and Anderson would be good additions to the Utah front court.

HoopsHabit Mock Draft (updated 06.03)

How would Jazz faithful feel about a draft that netted Exum, Swiss big man Clint Capela and guard Joe Harris? That what this site has occurring. Capela is an intriguing player who possesses great potential and upside. It does not hurt that he and Rudy Gobert are friends.

MyNBADraft.com Mock Draft (updated 05.29)

Another mock thinking Vonleh and McDaniels are Salt Lake City-bound. Those seem to be very popular choices of late.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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