Jazz officially announce signing of Randy Foye

July 25th, 2012 | by Spencer Hall

Video compiled by memoismoney

After a million days since we first heard about it, the Jazz officially announced that Randy Foye will join the team next season. The terms of the contract weren’t released by the team, but since this is 2012, people can do their own research and find that it’s a one-year deal worth $2.5M, apparently. Nothing super flashy, but Kevin O’Connor and the Jazz have made some solid moves this offseason. More than anything, I like the fresh faces and the possibility of some new energy.

The Salt Lake Tribune’s Steve Luhm got this quote from Kevin O’Connor before the signing was announced:

Here’s the full press release:

Jazz Agrees to Terms with Guard Randy Foye
Six-year NBA veteran averaged 11.0 points, 2.2 assists for Clippers in 2011-12

SALT LAKE CITY (July 25, 2012) – Utah Jazz general manager Kevin O’Connor announced today that the team has agreed to terms with free-agent guard Randy Foye, pending the outcome of a physical. Per team policy, terms of the contract were not released.

The 28-year-old Foye (6-4, 213, Villanova) is entering his seventh NBA season and has played in 389 career games (214 starts) with Minnesota, Washington and the Los Angeles Clippers, owning career averages of 11.6 points, 3.2 assists and 2.4 rebounds in 27.1 minutes. A career 86.1-percent free-throw shooter, Foye twice has finished in the NBA’s top 10 in free-throw percentage (2009-10, 2010-11).

This past season Foye saw action in 65 of a possible 66 games (48 starts) for the Clippers, averaging 11.0 points, 2.2 assists and 2.1 rebounds in 25.9 minutes while helping L.A. to the best record in franchise history and a trip to the Western Conference Semifinals. Foye led the Clippers in three-pointers made and attempted (127-329, .386) last season, ranking seventh in the NBA in both categories, and scored 20-plus points on nine occasions, including equaling a Clipper franchise-record with eight made threes (8-15 3FG, 10-19 FG) in a 28-point effort at Dallas on April 2, 2012. Foye led the NBA with 46 made three-pointers from March 30 through the end of the regular season and averaged 15.3 points over the final 15 games of the season, hitting the 20-point mark five times in that span. He also had a streak of 21 straight games with at least one three-pointer from March 17 – April 22. Foye was teammates with recent Jazz addition Mo Williams the last two seasons in L.A.

Originally selected by the Boston Celtics in the first-round (seventh overall) of the 2006 NBA Draft, Foye was traded to Minnesota on a draft-night deal and was selected to the 2007 NBA All-Rookie First Team. He played for the Timberwolves from 2006-09, the Washington Wizards in 2009-10, and the Clippers from 2010-12.

Prior to the NBA, the Newark, N.J., native played four seasons at Villanova University (2002-06), where he averaged 14.9 points, 4.8 rebounds, 3.2 assists and 1.51 steals in 131 games (128 starts). He finished his career as the eighth-leading scorer in Villanova history (1,966 points) and was an Associated Press First Team All-American his senior year as he led the Wildcats to a No. 1 seed in the 2006 NCAA Tournament and Elite Eight appearance.

Foye operates a charitable foundation, the Randy Foye Foundation (www.randyfoye.org), which raises funds and develops programs and projects aimed directly at improving the lives of the people, especially the kids, of Newark.

Spencer Hall
Founder Spencer Hall has covered the NBA, Team USA and NBA D-League since 2007 and launched Salt City Hoops in 2009. Spencer is now the news director at KSL.com
Spencer Hall
Spencer Hall

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One Comment

  1. This is certainly a good situation for Foye. He may even have an opportunity to start; however i do not see him as a long term solution for Utah’s perimeter woes.

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