Salt City Hoops » richard jefferson http://saltcityhoops.com The ESPN TrueHoop Utah Jazz Site Wed, 17 Sep 2014 19:09:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 The ESPN TrueHoop Utah Jazz Site Salt City Hoops no The ESPN TrueHoop Utah Jazz Site Salt City Hoops » richard jefferson http://saltcityhoops.com/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://saltcityhoops.com Where Are They Now? Former Utah Jazz Players http://saltcityhoops.com/where-are-they-now-former-utah-jazz-players/ http://saltcityhoops.com/where-are-they-now-former-utah-jazz-players/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 13:41:42 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=12782 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images

It’s always interesting for fans to keep an eye on those who once donned the Utah Jazz uniform. After another busy offseason around the league, here is the full list of where former Jazzmen are playing, and some thoughts about their upcoming seasons.

DeMarre Carroll, Atlanta Hawks: Last season, the gritty forward enjoyed a career-year. After toiling for four teams in four seasons, Carroll may have found a home with the Hawks. He posted 11.1 PPG, 5.5 RPG, 1.8 APG and 1.5 SPG, complete with some great defense (2.6 DWS) and shooting (.575 TS%). Carroll still just had a 13.9 PER and is probably better suited playing just a touch less than the 32.1 MPG he played. He has been effusive in his praise of new Jazz coach Quin Snyder, citing his efforts as a big catalyst for his improvement.

Kyle Korver, Atlanta Hawks: The sharp-shooting forward had another solid season, putting up 12.0 PPG, 2.9 APG and 4.0 RPG for the Hawks. Korver’s stellar marksmanship (47.5 percent field goals, 47.2 percent on 3s and 92.6 percent from the line) paced the NBA with a .653 True Shooting Percentage. Add in a 5.9 WS, and you can see Korver’s importance for Atlanta. Look for him to do much of the same this year. While he fell short of making the USA FIBA team, Korver’s value has managed to increase as his career progresses.

Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks: When Al Horford went down with a season-ending injury, Paul Millsap stepped up in a major way. Sporting a nice 3-point touch, his 17.9 PPG, 8.5 RPG, 3.1 APG, 1.7 SPG and 1.1 BPG were enough to earn his first-ever All-Star appearance. Many of his advanced numbers mirrored his remarkable consistency during his Jazz days, so it was refreshing to see him earn that accolade at last. Even so, there still is a feeling that Millsap is underrated. He’s even been mentioned on some “Most Likely to be Traded” lists out there, perhaps due in part to his expiring $9.5 million  contract. If Atlanta is smart, they will hold on to the do-it-all forward.

Andrei Kirilenko, Brooklyn Nets: Injuries plagued AK-47, but he still added value to a Brooklyn bench that struggled at times. Kirilenko has definitely lost some of the zip that made his one of the NBA’s most unique players for years. He averaged just 5.0 PPG last year, but showed he can still facilitate. At just $3.3 million, he is a solid guy for the Nets to have.

Deron Williams, Brooklyn Nets: It certainly was a down year for Deron Williams. Across the board, his numbers were his worst since his first season. He’s dropped from 21.0 PPG to 18.9 to 14.3 the past three years (8.7 APG to 7.7 to 6.1). Given the additions of Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Kirilenko, optimism was high that DWill would be the quarterback of a veteran-laden team that would compete with the Heat and Pacers. Instead, injuries really hurt his game. At just 29, Williams can bounce back. Given the Brooklyn market, and the fact that he’s in line to earn $63 million over the next three years, the pressure is on. By many accounts, new coach Lionel Hollins plans to funnel most of the offense through Williams.

Al Jefferson, Charlotte Bobcats: Like Millsap, it was wonderful to see Jefferson earn the praise that he’s deserved for many years. He was the key to the Bobcats’ resurgence, as he provided a bonafide scoring threat inside– 21.8 PPG and 10.8 RPG. Head coach Steve Clifford used him well on both ends, helping him be a big part of their defensive identity. Evidence: Big Al’s career-high 4.7 DWS. Strangely enough, he did not make the All-Star team, but garnered All-NBA Third Team honors. With an excellent offseason, Charlotte is poised to make another jump in the Eastern Conference with Jefferson as the focal point. While his three-year, $41 million contract opened some eyes, most view it as a bargain for his production and leadership.

Marvin Williams, Charlotte Bobcats: Always a terrific locker room presence and solid on-court performer, it was difficult to see Marvin Williams depart Salt Lake City. He did everything that was asked of him, even developing into a good stretch four for the Jazz. Williams inked a two-year, $14 million deal with Charlotte to reunite with Jefferson and return to his collegiate home. With his combination of stout defense, improved rebounding and outside shooting, he will add a lot to the Bobcats. He will compete for a starting position.

John Lucas III, Cleveland Cavaliers: Lucas struggled with Utah. With Trey Burke’s early injury, he was thrust into the ill-suited role of starter and he never really recovered from that poor start. Diante Garrett quickly usurped him in the Jazz’s pecking order. Whether or not he makes the Cleveland roster remains to be determined. It sounds like he will be given the chance, with only Kyrie Irving and Matthew Dellavedova being the only other point guards in the fold.

Erik Murphy, Cleveland Cavaliers: Murphy, too, is facing an uphill battle. The Cavs seemingly dealt for Lucas, Murphy and Malcolm Thomas to use as trade filler in any Kevin Love deal,  then ended up holding on to all three of them. Along the way, Murphy’s contract was guaranteed.

Malcolm Thomas, Cleveland Cavaliers: By some accounts, Thomas seems like a player Cleveland is genuinely interested in keeping and using. With his blend of athleticism and length, he seems like a low-cost, potentially decent-reward guy to have at the end of the bench for the Cavs.

Devin Harris, Dallas Mavericks: Harris returned to his original NBA team and while injuries affected his season, he seemed to thrive in the third guard role for Dallas. Harris chipped in 7.9 PPG and 4.5 APG off the pine, with his 31.0 AST% being his best since his New Jersey days. He re-signed for a modest contract and will be a valuable cog for a Mavericks team that could surprise, thanks to a very good offseason that also saw Tyson Chandler, Chandler Parsons and Jameer Nelson join its ranks.

Richard Jefferson, Dallas Mavericks: Like Marvin Williams, Jefferson too put forth a resurgent effort. After languishing in Golden State, he started for Utah and showed that he still had some gas in the tank. With Vince Carter’s departure to Memphis, Jefferson could fill the role of a shooter off the bench. Signing him for the veteran’s minimum was another solid move for Dallas.

Randy Foye, Denver Nuggets: Foye had a nice lone season in Utah and did even better in his first with Denver. With other guards being hit with injuries, the Nuggets relied on him more than expected. With 13.2 PPG and 3.5 APG, Foye did his best to help Denver remain in the playoff picture for a good part of the season. With Ty Lawson and Nate Robinson coming back and Arron Afflalo’s return to the Mile High City, Foye may be back in a super sub role – one in which he does quite well.

Brandon Rush, Golden State Warriors: One year after being traded to Utah by the Warriors, Rush made his way back to the Bay Area. Given his lackluster play and poor body language in Utah, his heart was probably always in Golden State. If he can recapture some of his former self, he can be a solid perimeter addition to the Warriors bench.

C.J.Miles, Indiana Pacers: Despite playing nine NBA seasons, Miles is shockingly just 27. He had his best 3-point shooting seasons with the Cavaliers, which is the likely reason Indiana added him. He was to be a much-needed shooter for the Pacers, but with Paul George’s devastating injury, Miles may be asked to assume a bigger role – perhaps even starting. It will be interesting to see if Miles can seize this opportunity.

Carlos Boozer, Los Angeles Lakers: Carlos Boozer’s 2013-14 season was quite forgettable. His 13.7 PPG and 8.3 RPG were the lowest of his career since his rookie campaign. His 14.4 PER was by far the worst of his 12 seasons. The biggest stat for the Chicago Bulls was the $13.5 million he was set to make during the upcoming season. With the continued improvement of Taj Gibson and the additions of Pau Gasol and Nikola Mirotic, Boozer was an amnesty casualty.

Enter the Los Angeles Lakers. It is hard to determine what this franchise’s direction is. They added a slew of players to join the returning-from-injury Kobe Bryant, seemingly in hopes to provide enough firepower to compete in the Western Conference. Boozer will be looked on for some much-needed scoring. That said, with the glut of power forwards on the roster, it remains to be seen how much playing time the two-time All-Star will see. Especially when his age (32) and defense are taken into consideration.

Kosta Koufos, Memphis Grizzlies: After several underrated good years for Denver, Koufos brought some solid play to the Memphis front court. With 6.4 PPG and 5.2 RPG in 16.9 MPG, he provided depth behind Marc Gasol and Zach Randolph. His shooting took a dip last season, but a 16.5 PER for your back-up is still very good; ditto the 3.5 WS and 18.4 TRB% (22.7 DRB%). He will continue to provide quality minutes and can step in to start, when needed.

Kyrylo Fesenko, Minnesota Timberwolves: Big Fes was a fan favorite during his four seasons. He had his moments and showed defensive potential. His immaturity, though, was an issue. After appearing in just three NBA the past three seasons, Fesenko is embarking on a comeback with the Minnesota Timberwolves. He impressed enough in summer league to earn a training camp invite. Given the rebuilding roster, the 7’1″, 288 lb gargantuan center might have a chance to stick.

Othyus Jeffers, Minnesota Timberwolves: The energetic Jeffers has made the rounds since finishing up the 2010 season with Utah. He hooked on with Minnesota right before the end of the last year and is still listed on its roster.

Mo Williams, Minnesota Timberwolves: After seeing success in a back-up role with the surprising Portland Trailblazers, Williams opted out of his contract and found the market wasn’t too kind. When things settled down, he inked a deal with Minnesota. It was a perplexing signing, with Ricky Rubio, Zach LaVine and, until they ship him out, J.J. Barea in tow. Given the dramatically changed roster, perhaps Mo will be looked on for veteran leadership.

Diante Garrett, Portland Trailblazers: After being a pleasant addition to the Jazz last year, he was unfortunately traded to Toronto in the Steve Novak transaction. After being waived by the Raptors, he signed a non-guaranteed contract with Portland in hopes of sticking. With his size and improved outside shooting, he would be a nice player to have on the bench, even with the guards the Blazers already have.

Wesley Matthews, Portland Trailblazers: After three solid seasons, Matthews made a little jump last season, enjoying his best year as a professional. His first half of the season was especially torrid, as he was shooting lights out. There was even talk of him making the Western Conference All-Star team. He finished the year averaging 16.4 PPG, while making 2.5 3s per outing. He leapt from 4.7 WS to 8.2 last year (going from 3.6 to 6.3 on OWS). Working with Damian Lillard, Matthews is part of a very potent back court that is among the best in the league.

Kris Humphries, Washington Wizards: While the Boston Celtics had a rebuilding year, Humphries had a quietly solid bounce-back season. He chipped in 8.4 PPG and 5.9 RPG in just 19.9 MPG, along with .552 TS% and 4.1 WS. Washington is a team on the rise and Humphries adds another capable back-up to their front court.

There are several others who are still out there without NBA contracts: Ronnie Brewer, Earl Watson, Ronnie Price, Eric Maynor, Andris Biedrins, Jamaal Tinsley, Mike Harris, Josh Howard, Lou Amundson. With the exception of Howard, all spent time on NBA rosters last season.

And just for fun, here are some former Jazzmen in the NBA’s coaching ranks:

Jarron Collins, Los Angeles Clippers: Collins will get his first chance as an NBA assistant coach. Always respected for his attitude and demeanor, it is nice to see him getting this opportunity with Doc Rivers and one of the league’s contending teams.

Howard Eisley, Los Angeles Clippers: Eisley continues in his role with the Clippers. He seems to be a valued part of the staff; no surprise, given his basketball knowledge.

Derek Fisher, New York Knicks: After 18 seasons and five championships, Derek Fisher was not unemployed for long. Phil Jackson plucked him up quickly, signing him to a five-year, $25 million pact. That’s a lot of scratch for someone who’s never coached at any level (though the same applies to Golden State’s deal with Steve Kerr). It will be very interesting to see what Fisher does in the Big Apple and the inherent scrutiny that exists therein. The Knicks roster does not do much to inspire.

Jacque Vaughn, Orlando Magic: Entering his third season in charge, the expectations are again low for Vaughn’s team to produce Ws. What they are looking for is continued player and talent development. That sounds familiar.

Jeff Hornacek, Phoenix Suns: Hornacek and his upstart Suns were among the NBA’s best stories last season. In his first year as head coach, Hornacek defied the most optimistic of expectations out there by producing an entertaining brand of basketball that got them within a breath of the postseason. Almost to a man, each Phoenix player had career-years–from established veterans like Goran Dragic and Channing Frye, to guys who were seemingly discarded in Miles Plumlee, P.J. Tucker and Gerald Green. The bar was set high. Can Hornacek build upon the momentum there in Phoenix? It would be tough to bet against him.

Tyrone Corbin, Sacramento Kings: Much has been said about Tyrone Corbin’s tenure as Utah’s head coach. There were ups and downs. Corbin gave his all and dedicated the past 12 years to the franchise. While he had struggles at the helm, he was largely considered one of the NBA’s best assistant coaches prior to replacing Jerry Sloan. Corbin should succeed in Sacramento as the lead assistant there, bringing professionalism to a talented Kings roster.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Bynum for Jefferson, Trey Burke, and Coaching – Salt City Hoops Saturday Show http://saltcityhoops.com/bynum-for-jefferson-trey-burke-and-coaching-salt-city-hoops-saturday-show/ http://saltcityhoops.com/bynum-for-jefferson-trey-burke-and-coaching-salt-city-hoops-saturday-show/#comments Mon, 06 Jan 2014 06:23:49 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=9397 Author information
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen is the Managing Editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz. He also hosts a radio show and podcast every week on ESPN700 AM in Salt Lake City.
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Could Andrew Bynum be a Jazzman? Why, and for how long? Photo by David Liam Kyle/NBAE via Getty Images

Could Andrew Bynum be a Jazzman? Why, and for how long? Photo by David Liam Kyle/NBAE via Getty Images

This week, Austin Horton and Andy Larsen talk about the Richard Jefferson for Andrew Bynum discussions, as reported by ESPN’s Marc Stein. Why does the move make sense for both sides? Would the Jazz be losing anything on the court by losing Jefferson? Why would the Cavs do this deal? What would this proposed trade say about the relationship between the coaching staff and the front office? Finally, should either team demand sweetener in the deal? Then, we congratulate Trey Burke on his Rookie of the Month award, the first Jazzman since Karl Malone to be so honored. How should Jazz fans weigh that award compared to his 39% shooting? Finally, we talk a little bit about Ty Corbin. Does he have the best interests of the Jazz long term in mind, or is he coaching for his next contract? All that and more on this week’s Saturday Show!

Author information

Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen is the Managing Editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz. He also hosts a radio show and podcast every week on ESPN700 AM in Salt Lake City.
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http://saltcityhoops.com/bynum-for-jefferson-trey-burke-and-coaching-salt-city-hoops-saturday-show/feed/ 3 andrew bynum,richard jefferson,Trey Burke This week, Austin Horton and Andy Larsen talk about the Richard Jefferson for Andrew Bynum discussions, as reported by ESPN's Marc Stein. Why does the move make sense for both sides? Would the Jazz be losing anything on the court by losing Jefferson? This week, Austin Horton and Andy Larsen talk about the Richard Jefferson for Andrew Bynum discussions, as reported by ESPN's Marc Stein. Why does the move make sense for both sides? Would the Jazz be losing anything on the court by losing Jefferson? Why would the Cavs do this deal? What would this proposed trade say about the relationship between the coaching staff and the front office? Finally, should either team demand sweetener in the deal? Then, we congratulate Trey Burke on his Rookie of the Month award, the first Jazzman since Karl Malone to be so honored. How should Jazz fans weigh that award compared to his 39% shooting? Finally, we talk a little bit about Ty Corbin. Does he have the best interests of the Jazz long term in mind, or is he coaching for his next contract? All that and more on this week's Saturday Show! Salt City Hoops no 44:10
Can Jeremy Evans be a Rotational Player? http://saltcityhoops.com/can-jeremy-evans-be-a-rotational-player/ http://saltcityhoops.com/can-jeremy-evans-be-a-rotational-player/#comments Thu, 21 Nov 2013 19:17:38 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=8728 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE via Getty Images

Melissa Majchrzak/NBAE via Getty Images

For a team in need of some good news, the Utah Jazz received some yesterday: rookie point guard Trey Burke made his official NBA debut versus the New Orleans Pelicans. While the highly-anticipated return by Burke from his broken finger is understandably receiving the most attention and accompanying headlines, there was a second boost in morale in the form of Jeremy Evans also being deemed healthy.

All eyes are naturally be focused on Burke, but many ardent Jazz fans are eager to see how Evans performs this season. During the off-season, given the turnover on Utah’s roster (particularly in the front court), it was believed that the high-flying forward might finally have a spot in the regular line-up. Now will be the chance to see if that happens.

All this leads to some big questions. Is Jeremy Evans a bonafide rotational player in the NBA? Can he be more than a situational guy who has the knack for making highlight reel plays?

Evans is a tremendous joy to watch. He is always flashing a smile and it’s clear that he has a love for the game of basketball. He seems to be the consummate locker room presence, always encouraging his teammates and never causing a bit of discord. His sheer athleticism and out-of-this-world leaping ability quickly made him a fan favorite. Earl Watson’s alley was nothing without Jeremy Evans’ oop. While some pundits minimize his Slam Dunk championship due to a somewhat diluted field of competitors, he still won it, fair-and-square. He’s had his fair share of in-game highlights, too. Who can forget this one?

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_CVAJBIwTA&autoplay=0]

And while it didn’t count, here’s this, as well.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HBfdbxmKrk&autoplay=0]

Through his first three seasons, Evans has seen minimal court time. In fact, his playing time has decreased each passing season. All in all, he has registered a mere 895 minutes in 115 games–7.8 MPG. While his playing time has been inconsistent, Evans has managed to produce when his name has been called. He boasts a career 64.7 percent shooting mark for his career, while putting up 2.7 PPG and 1.8 RPG in his stints. There have been games where foul trouble or injuries paved the way for some appearances and he simply injected energy into the game.

He is an advanced stats’ darling. Over his three campaigns, Evans has a True Shooting Percentage of .659 and an Effective Field Goal Percentage of .647. He earns trips to the free throw line, too, as evidenced by his .750 Free Throw Attempt Rate last year. A smart shot-blocker with fine defensive instincts, Evans has a 4.8 Block Percentage, including 8.8 his second season. While some reserves have some sparkling advanced stats, he has produced his consistently over three seasons, which shows his potential to do some good things.

Evans could possibly play both forward positions for spells. Power forward has been where he’s logged the most time thus far in his career. While his slight frame causes issues inside–he can get pushed around and sometimes accrues fouls as a result–his speed and agility partially compensate. For him to play the small forward spot, Evans will have to evolve a bit. In the summer league and preseason, Evans displayed a much-improved jump shot, though his handle is a bit spotty. He will need to show that he can keep defenses honest if he is to assume some time at the three.

The Jazz’s front court depth could lead to Evans seeing an increased role. As expected, Derrick Favors and Enes Kanter are getting the lion’s share of playing time. Richard Jefferson has had a mini rejuvenation, but has not been consistent. Marvin Williams’ return has helped and he’s seen time as a stretch four. Mike Harris has been a surprise, but is limited. Given this line-up, Evans could demand minutes once he gets more into game-shape and could quickly take the time that Harris has been given. It’ll then be up to him to demonstrate what he is capable of in a more expansive role.

This season has been branded by some as a season of discovery– a chance to see what each player on the roster can do. Every individual on the team has or will assume a new niche in the rotation, and Jeremy Evans is not an exception. Will he become a rotational player? We will find out over the coming months.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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The Triple Team: Three Thoughts on Jazz vs. Rockets 11/2/2013 http://saltcityhoops.com/the-triple-team-three-thoughts-on-jazz-vs-rockets-1122013/ http://saltcityhoops.com/the-triple-team-three-thoughts-on-jazz-vs-rockets-1122013/#comments Sun, 03 Nov 2013 05:06:05 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=8382 Author information
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen is the Managing Editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz. He also hosts a radio show and podcast every week on ESPN700 AM in Salt Lake City.
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AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

1. In the second half, the Jazz fell apart both offensively and defensively.

The Jazz took a 16 point lead into halftime of this one, having both out-executed and out-hustled the Rockets on both ends of the floor. But in the second half, Houston took a much different approach. The Rockets returned to their incredibly successful pick and roll game, getting James Harden and Dwight Howard 16 and 12 points respectively between them in the second half. This might have been expected from two NBA stars as elite as Harden and Howard.

Unexpected, though, was the Jazz’s total collapse on offense. The Jazz scored just 37 points in the second half after scoring 54 in the first. Worse, the Jazz had just 1 assist in the second half, coming after the Rockets had already extended an 11 point lead on the reeling Jazz. “Jazz basketball”, or at least the ideal thereof, involves lots of passing to open cutters leading to many assists for all involved. That was’t the case in the second half. While the Jazz’s media guide promises me that the Jazz have had 0 or 1 assists in a half “many times”, it hasn’t happened since before 2000, when basketball-reference.com’s play-by-play data begins. Corbin used a lack of “energy” as the reason behind the second half display, the nonexistent ball movement in the half suggests more was at fault with Utah’s quick slide.

2. Alec Burks’ on-ball defense has really improved.

Alec Burks has struggled so far defensively in his NBA career. I highlighted his tendency to get caught up in screens here, but there have been other struggles as well. But during the minutes he played against James Harden, he showed a pretty remarkable ability to stay in front of Harden, preventing any drives and frustrating Harden into passes or bad shots. Coach Ty Corbin agreed. When asked about it, Corbin responded “I think he’s getting better. He’s fighting, and that’s the main thing. His posture’s getting better, and when he’s playing a guy like James Harden, how he has to stay connected to him, stay down, and play throughout the play… He’s getting better at those angles.” Burks still struggles with off-ball defense, especially when getting run through a gamut of screens, but his on-ball defense gives Ty Corbin an option to play him against the league’s superstar wings.

3. Francisco Garcia and Richard Jefferson’s battle was fun.

No, it’s not a critically important battle amongst NBA stars, but Francisco Garcia and Richard Jefferson displayed some aging-veteran flavored animosity during tonight’s game. In the first half, Jefferson was going up for a layup when Garcia fouled him hard from behind, cutting down on Jefferson’s shoulder. Jefferson retaliated with a little push, earning him a technical. Then, in the second half, Jefferson exploited Garcia’s poor exterior defense by driving on Garcia despite his own slowing first step. On one play, Garcia again fouled Jefferson on a drive, knocking the Rocket wing to the floor. The TV timeout came next, and as Jefferson walked to the bench, Jefferson took a look back at the floored Garcia. For his part in the same timeout, Garcia snapped somewhat, throwing his towel to the ground and clapping multiple times in frustration. The two could be seen talking to each other on the court for much of the game.

I asked Richard about it after the game, and he brought up the years of experience the two have as opposing NBA wings. “You think it’s chippy,” Jefferson said, “but if I push him or he fouls me hard, that’s just a level of respect we have for each other.” Jefferson, for his part, led the Jazz with 18 points, whereas Garcia finished with 3 threes and 12 points total.

Author information

Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen is the Managing Editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz. He also hosts a radio show and podcast every week on ESPN700 AM in Salt Lake City.
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Utah Jazz Positional Battles: The Bench http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-positional-battles-the-bench/ http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-positional-battles-the-bench/#comments Wed, 09 Oct 2013 21:29:28 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=7872 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Tuesday’s preseason opener against the Golden State Warriors may have shed some light on how the bench positional battles will unfold–at least to start the season. Then again, it was one game and a preseason one at that. Add to the equation two returning-from-injury guys in Marvin Williams and Brandon Rush and thing could get interesting really quickly. We covered the starters, so let’s turn our attention to the bench.

BACK-UP POINT GUARD

Candidates: John Lucas III, Alec Burks. To a much lesser extent: Ian Clark, Scott Machado

This spot has some intrigue to me. Lucas has said all the right things since signing on the dotted line, and it appears that he is eager to serve in the mentor role for Burke. He is not the purest of point guards, but has experience that should suit him fine in Utah. Against the Warriors, Lucas was often the best player on the court. His shot selection was excellent and his hustle and enthusiasm, contagious. It was telling that the Jazz brass sent Burks to Spokane to work with Stockton, as well. He played minutes as the back-up last season, and while he had his moments, his performance was largely unspectacular. That said, the talent is there to be another ball handler and facilitator and he could get some extra PT here. A tandem of Burks and Lucas could be exciting and disruptive on defense. An interesting guy to watch during pre-season will be Ian Clark and whether he can play spot point guard minutes as needed. Machado has a good chance of making the team, but if so, will most likely anchor the bench.

Prediction: John Lucas III

BACK-UP SHOOTING GUARD

Candidates: Alec Burks, Brandon Rush. Outside chance: Ian Clark

Tuesday evening, Burks came off the pine. That said, at least for now, I’ll stick with my prediction that he earns the starting nod. I could indeed see that possibly changing when Rush is fully healthy (in that scenario, I see Hayward starting at small forward and Richard Jefferson moving to a reserve role). Either way, Burks or Rush would be depended upon to provide leadership and scoring in the second unit.

Prediction: Brandon Rush

BACK-UP SMALL FORWARD

Candidates: Richard Jefferson, Marvin Williams, Jeremy Evans. Don’t forget: Dominic McGuire

Again, Jefferson got the opening night nod at the three. This is another situation in which I think health will factor heavily. It makes sense why Tyrone Corbin went this way last evening, especially seeing the results of Burks as the featured scorer off the bench. So, to remain consistent, my money is still on Hayward being the starter and then watching an interesting battle between Williams and Jefferson. Marvin has more to offer at this point in their careers. Jeremy Evans could get spot minutes at the small forward, especially if he continues to show a much-improved jump shot. Dominic McGuire not only has a great chance of making the final roster, but being called upon as a situational player. He does a lot of the small things that coaches love.

Prediction: Marvin Williams

BACK-UP POWER FORWARD

Candidates: Jeremy Evans, Marvin Williams.

Evans has always been wildly productive during the spot minutes he’s played his first three seasons. Against Golden State, he displayed the full repertoire of what he can potentially offer as a rotational player. He hustled, crashed the boards, played solid defense, and showed offensive abilities. While he may still struggle against bulkier opponents in the post, his length and ridiculous leaping ability might more than compensate. This role is his for the taking and Corbin sounds very happy with his progress. Williams could fill the need for a stretch four against teams that employ a big front court.

Prediction: Jeremy Evans

BACK-UP CENTER

Candidates: Andris Biedrins, Rudy Gobert

While Derrick Favors and Enes Kanter will man most of the big man minutes, this will be a battle to watch. Against the Warriors, the veteran Biedrins got the first opportunity, but the young rookie played more minutes. The reports have been positive on both, with Corbin expressing admiration for the growth Gobert has already shown. This one could initially be a toss-up, but I think the French center will earn some minutes in the pivot.

Prediction: Rudy Gobert

Lastly, with 13 players on the roster with contracts (including Clark’s partially guaranteed deal), there could be two more who start the season in a Jazz uniform. Local media has mentioned the possibility of carrying a maximum 15 players–especially with recovering injuries being a factor. Should that be the case, McGuire and Machado might have the edge right now, with swingman Justin Holiday also being in the mix.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Utah Jazz Positional Battles: The Starters http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-positional-battles-the-starters/ http://saltcityhoops.com/utah-jazz-positional-battles-the-starters/#comments Wed, 02 Oct 2013 21:47:20 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=7869 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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The season is, at long-last, finally here. Media day is in the books, two-a-days are going, and Saturday’s annual scrimmage will give the public the first look at the new era of Utah Jazz basketball. In less than a week, the first of at least 86 broadcasts will be on television sets and Internet streams everywhere. It’s like Christmas time for NBA fans.

There is a lot of excitement in the air. There always is at this time of the year, but there is more this season. The mix of anticipation, uncertainty, and optimism is palpable. The time has come for the Jazz to see what they have in their young guys. Given the fact that there has been so much roster turnover this off-season, some of the main storylines in Utah’s camp will be positional battles. Who will fit what role?

In a two-part series, I’ll break down my prognostications. The first half will focus on the starting five, while the second will outline the reserves.

STARTING POINT GUARD

Candidates: Trey Burke, John Lucas III

My friends Andy Larsen, Austin Horton, and Daniel Tate did a nice job dissecting this particular topic on last week’s Salt City Hoops Saturday Show. I too think there is little debate here: my guess is Trey Burke will show that he is the guy from the get-go. We can delve into history, but it really is a new day and mindset (while Jerry Sloan did opt for Keith McLeod and Milt Palacio over Deron Williams, he has since admitted that he should’ve gone with DWill from the start). With the emphasis on youth, Burke will be given the keys from day one and Tyrone Corbin and company will see what they have in their high profile rookie point guard. Side note: I love hearing about Burke’s (and Alec Burks’) time with legend John Stockton. That tutoring seems to be impactful already.

Prediction: Trey Burke

STARTING SHOOTING GUARD

Candidates: Alec Burks, Brandon Rush, Gordon Hayward

This could be the most intriguing and suspenseful battle going forward. By many accounts, Alec Burks has been one of the most impressive guys this off-season, including his hard work at P3. That bodes well for Burks, who could potentially see the biggest boosts in on-court production this season (seeing as he has proven the least thus far in his career of the young players). If he can come in and show his improvement in defense, ballhandling, and shooting, this spot may be his for the taking. Brandon Rush brings a lot to the table. A self-stated “3-and-D” guy, Rush’s combination of perimeter prowess and defensive effort could be a big boon for the Jazz. While he is cleared for full contact, the Jazz will probably (and wisely so) be cautious. One of Gordon Hayward’s biggest strengths is his versatility. While I personally prefer him at shooting guard, given the personnel at each spot, it makes more sense at the three. I see Corbin starting out with Burks in the opening five, but continually analyzing things as the season progresses. There may come a time where Burks’ offense might be more needed off the bench, while Rush’s skills could compliment the starters.

Prediction: Alec Burks

STARTING SMALL FORWARD

Candidates: Gordon Hayward, Marvin Williams, Richard Jefferson

Again, there seems little to question here. Gordon Hayward is the leader of the team now and should be the opening day small forward starter. The only scenario where this doesn’t happen is if the aforementioned prediction does not occur and Corbin slots Hayward in at shooting guard. If that happened, it would be a curious competition between two vets in Marvin Williams and Richard Jefferson. Both can shoot from the outside, but if his health is there, Williams’ defense and familiarity would probably give him the edge.

Prediction: Gordon Hayward

STARTING POWER FORWARD and STARTING CENTER

Candidates: Derrick Favors and Enes Kanter

The decisions to not bring back Al Jefferson and Paul Millsap clearly paved the way for the Favors and Kanter show. There will be times where these two will be interchangeable at the power positions. It will be exciting to see how they can mesh together, given how relatively little they’ve been paired up in the their young careers. Defensively, they could be formidable. The offense, however, will be something to watch carefully. Can Favors become more consistent? Will Kanter’s offensively elite play as a reserve translate in a much more prominent role? One thing that will be a delight: these two should dominate the boards.

By the way, how wonderful was it to see images of Karl Malone working with not only this duo, but Jeremy Evans, Rudy Gobert, and Andris Biedrins? It gets me giddy.

Predictions: Derrick Favors at PF and Enes Kanter at C

The youth movement is officially underway.

Stay tuned for the second installment, covering the positional battles off the bench.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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2013-14 Utah Jazz: Figuring out a Rotation http://saltcityhoops.com/2013-14-utah-jazz-figuring-out-a-rotation/ http://saltcityhoops.com/2013-14-utah-jazz-figuring-out-a-rotation/#comments Tue, 06 Aug 2013 20:52:54 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=7327 Author information
Denim Millward
Denim Millward
Denim Millward, before SCH, wrote for Bleacher Report about the Jazz and the NBA. Despite this, he is actually a good writer, and we promise we will eschew the slideshow format on this site. He also contributes to The Color Commentator Magazine, and strangely, likes wrestling.
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In a season that most anticipate to be a rebuilding effort for the Jazz, the prime objective seems to be giving the young core as much playing time as reasonably possible.  Despite this clear path, Utah’s rotation is, as my high school Geometry teacher Mr. Dolkhani so eloquently put it, “clear as mud.”

Barring injury, the starting lineup seems to be already determined.  It’s when you look at the second unit that things start to become muddled, with numerous possibilities to consider.  Who’s the first point guard off the bench?  How much playing time will the Overpaid Duo (Andris Biedrins and Richard Jefferson) get?  Exactly how good does the Jazz think Ian Clark can be?  When he returns, where does Marvin Williams fit in?

In an effort to bring a small modicum of clarity to the situation, I’ve broken down each position for the starting and second units and who will/may inhabit those positions.

Starting Point Guard:  Trey Burke

It’s a little ironic that the position of biggest need for Utah is among the surest things, at least in the starting lineup.  Jazz GM Dennis Lindsey traded up to nab the former Michigan Wolverine, and then brought in one average-at-best veteran point guard, John Lucas III, for depth.  It’s obvious Burke will get and keep the starting point guard gig barring injury, tremendous struggles at the position or a meteoric rise at point by Burks or Clark.

Starting Shooting Guard:  Alec Burks

Other Possibilities:  Brandon Rush, Gordon Hayward

Get ready, Burks fans.  Alec is about to have a bunch of minutes allocated to him, and will get a chance to showcase his talents.  I feel less confident about this spot, however, than I do about the point guard position for a few reasons.  Newcomer Brandon Rush is by far the most useful of the triumvirate acquired from Golden State.  Depending on how he performs and how much Utah’s second unit struggles to score, I could see Jazz head coach Ty Corbin opting to give Rush the starting nod for his perimeter defense and three-point shooting acumen and utilizing Burks’ scoring ability to inject life into a potentially anemic bench squad. No matter if he starts, Burks is in line for the biggest role increase on the team.  Gordon Hayward is another possibility at the starting 2-guard spot, but I can’t see him pushing Burks or Rush out of the position due to the lack of depth at small forward.

Starting Small Forward:  Gordon Hayward

Everyone’s favorite Starcraft player is now the Jazz’s elder statesman, and will be expected to have a much larger leadership role following the mass exodus of veterans from the Utah ranks this offseason.  Hayward is about as sure a thing to start at small forward as possible considering the dearth of true small forwards on the team.  Marvin Williams will miss the first portion of the season recovering from an Achilles tendon injury, and it’s already being postulated that Williams could be utilized as a stretch 4 off the bench.  Considering Richard Jefferson is the only other pure small forward (Rush can play 3 in a pinch, but seems better suited at 2), and Hayward’s starting position is solidified.

Starting Power Forward:  Derrick Favors

Starting Center:  Enes Kanter

It’s so inconceivable for a healthy Favors or Kanter not to start, I’ll just say this:  I’m all geeked up to see what they can do this season while given starter’s minutes.

Here is where things get messy.

Backup Point Guard:  John Lucas III

Other Possibilities:  Alec Burks, Ian Clark

I gave the nod to Lucas for the simple fact that he’s the only other pure point guard on the roster.  Even if Lucas starts the season as the floor general for the bench unit, it would not at all surprise me to see him supplanted by Alec Burks or even undrafted free agent Ian Clark.  Clark especially intrigues me at this position.   At 6’3” and 175 lbs, he may be undersized to guard the bigger shooting guards in the league, which may cause Corbin to play him at point if his performance demands significant minutes every game.

Backup Shooting Guard: Brandon Rush

Other Possibilities:  Ian Clark, Alec Burks

With Burks penciled in as starting shooting guard, logic dictates that Rush would be the first off-guard off the bench.  An established veteran with good defensive and shooting skills, Rush could prove to be a valuable piece for the Utah Jazz beyond this season.  Throw in the fact that it’s a contract year for Rush, and he has more than enough incentive to excel in any and every situation in which he’s put.

Backup Small Forward:  Marvin Williams

Other Possibilities: Richard Jefferson, Jeremy Evans

Until Marvin Williams returns from injury, it will be interesting (and probably a little ugly) to see what Corbin & Co. can cobble together.  Jefferson is coming off a year in which he was barely used, and certainly has seen his best days as a player.  Prior to last season, Jefferson had shot a good percentage from three.  If he can find his shooting stroke once again, he may be a serviceable replacement.  Evans saw a few minutes last year at small forward, and is a possibility, albeit a remote one, to fill in at 3.

Backup Big Men:  Andris Biedrins, Rudy Gobert

Other Possibilities: Jeremy Evans, Marvin Williams

For a young and raw player, Rudy Gobert appears to be headed for a significant amount of minutes and a crash course in NBA basketball.  With his unbelievable wingspan and high motor, his defensive presence should allow him to remain on the court, despite his fledgling offensive game.

Biedrins and Evans seem to be in competition for the final rotation spot at one of the posts.  It seems too offensively detrimental to play Biedrins and Gobert together, but Jeremy Evans is no Adrian Dantley himself.  Marvin could certainly be a passable stretch 4, but the aforementioned dearth of depth at 3 could force Corbin’s hand.

 

 

Author information

Denim Millward
Denim Millward
Denim Millward, before SCH, wrote for Bleacher Report about the Jazz and the NBA. Despite this, he is actually a good writer, and we promise we will eschew the slideshow format on this site. He also contributes to The Color Commentator Magazine, and strangely, likes wrestling.
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Brandon Rush: Part of the Now and the Future http://saltcityhoops.com/brandon-rush-part-of-the-now-and-the-future/ http://saltcityhoops.com/brandon-rush-part-of-the-now-and-the-future/#comments Wed, 31 Jul 2013 16:16:23 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=7257 Author information
David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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As is always the case, it is interesting to see national takes on anything Utah Jazz-related. Naturally there has been a lot of discussion of late regarding the big Jazz/Golden State Warriors trade. In his column analyzing the NBA off-season to this point, Grantland’s Bill Simmons writes the following (tying different quotes from the movie Midnight Run to happenings in the Association):

“Don’t worry, Eddie. For 25 grand I’ll bring him in on a silver platter!”

To the Jazz, who let Al Jefferson and Paul Millsap leave, then assumed $24 million of Andris Biedrins–Richard Jefferson–Brandon Rush cap cloggage from Golden State just to get its unprotected 2014 and 2017 no. 1 picks. I’m all for bottoming out for 2014’s mega-draft and rebuilding around Derrick Favors, Enes Kanter, Alec Burks, Gordon Hayward, Trey Burke and picks/cap space … but $24 million of dead contracts for two first-rounders???? Thanks to Utah for making me feel better about the Celtics taking on three years and $30.3 million of Gerald Wallace’s basketball cadaver. For about four minutes.

Like many other national writers, Simmons sees why Utah made that move–to acquire assets, maintain flexibility, and center around their young core. And like some of his contemporaries, he also thinks the Jazz may have assumed too much money in return for those draft picks. I’m not here today to discuss those nuances of the trade, as that has been excellently covered my by fellow Salt City Hoops friends.

Here’s where I want to focus: Simmons includes Brandon Rush with Andris Biedrins and Richard Jefferson as “cap cloggage” and “dead contracts.” I respectfully disagree with Rush’s inclusion therein.

You wish to know why? I thought you’d never ask. In my opinion, Brandon Rush was a key part of the trade (along with those first-round picks) and is very much a cog in the now and the future of the Utah Jazz. In fact, his coming to Utah is one of the reasons I am genuinely excited about the upcoming season, which simply cannot arrive soon enough.

Without further ado, here are reasons I am big on Rush:

  • First off, his contract is anything but onerous. At $4 million, that is an absolute bargain for a knock-down shooter, as other off-season pacts for similar players have shown (Kyle Korver at four-years, $24 million and J.J. Redick at four-years, $27 million). Picking him up was an excellent use of cap space. Had he been a free agent, getting him for $4 million would have been a complete steal.
  • From things I’ve heard over the past few seasons, Utah has long been fans of his game. My guess is that Jazz brass insisted that he be a part of this transaction for that reason– not just to be roster/salary fodder, but to see if he can fit into the fabric of what Utah is weaving with their young team. I believe they are confident that he will.
  • Yes, he is coming off a horrible injury, but by all accounts, he will be ready to go for the season’s start.
  • His last full season in 2011-12: a career-best 9.8 ppg (50.1% field goals, 45.2% three-pointers, and 79.3% free-throws, for a True Shooting Percentage of 62.8%), 3.9 rpg, 1.4 apg, and 0.9 bpg in 26.4 mpg. That is solid production from one of your key reserves.
  • Perimeter marksmanship is essential, and with the Jazz opting to part ways with Randy Foye (and Mo Williams), Rush’s outside shooting will be crucial to the make-up of the team, especially in an offense that will still focus on Utah’s big men. He has eclipsed the 41% mark each of his past three healthy seasons and sports a 41.3% career mark. And again, he shot 45% his last complete season. That’s 9 makes for every 20 attempts. I’ll take it.
  • Speaking of which, it is equally easy for Rush to fit in start or come in off the bench. It naturally depends on how head coach Tyrone Corbin’s rotation shakes out, but supposing Derrick Favors, Enes Kanter, Gordon Hayward, and Trey Burke are tabbed as starters, Rush’s shooting could help balance out that unit’s offense. Alec Burks could then be a featured scorer off the bench, while capitalizing on his ball-handling skills when playing with guys like John Lucas III or the newest Jazzman, Ian Clark. Either way, Hayward, Burks, and Rush appear to be a solid three-man rotation on the wings.
  • Rush will get ample opportunities to assume a bigger role than he had with Indiana or Golden State, without interfering with the young guys’ development and growth. There are ample minutes and shots to spread around and Rush can definitely help fill the need for scoring and veteran play.
  • At 6’6″ and 210 lbs, I can envision Rush playing small forward in some line-ups. This will be big for the first portion of the season, as Marvin Williams works his way back into the line-up.
  • I love the 0.9 bpg from the wing position. He brings athleticism and defensive effort to the table.
  • He just turned 28 and pending his return from his injury, he is entering his prime. He is also in a contract year, so will be motivated to perform. And if/when he does, Utah may look to lock him up using a portion of their ample monetary reserves in the 2014 off-season.
  • He is very active and, better yet, interactive on Twitter. Make sure to follow him if you aren’t already.

Obviously Biedrins and Jefferson have monstrous contracts, are coming off poor seasons, and on paper, look like dead weight. Their time in Utah most likely will be short-lived.

Brandon Rush, on the other hand, is different in every way. He is a guy who can factor heavily into the now and the future of the team.

Author information

David J Smith
David J Smith
Besides writing for Salt City Hoops, David contributes to the Utah Jazz coverage for the Deseret News (instant analysis articles), WeAreUtahJazz.com, UtahJazz360.com and previously for Hoopsworld.com. He graduated from BYU and works for LDS Philanthropies. His wife, Elizabeth, is the most patient person in the world and they have four amazing children; Kadence, Tayah, Stockton (yes, really), and Cambria.
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Salt City Hoops Saturday Show – Analyzing the Biedrins/Jefferson/Rush Deal http://saltcityhoops.com/salt-city-hoops-saturday-show-analyzing-the-biedrinsjeffersonrush-deal/ http://saltcityhoops.com/salt-city-hoops-saturday-show-analyzing-the-biedrinsjeffersonrush-deal/#comments Wed, 10 Jul 2013 03:39:31 +0000 http://saltcityhoops.com/?p=6985 Author information
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen is the Managing Editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz. He also hosts a radio show and podcast every week on ESPN700 AM in Salt Lake City.
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On this week’s show, Andy Larsen and Ben Gaines analyze the big trade with the Golden State Warriors, in which the Warriors sent Biedrins, Jefferson, Rush, two first rounders, and two second rounders to the Jazz in exchange for Kevin Murphy. There were significant financial costs to the deal, but was it worth it?

Then, we invited Nate Parham of Golden State of Mind onto the show to learn a little bit more about the players received in the deal. Can Biedrins and Jefferson help the Jazz at all this season, or are they a lost cause? How does Brandon Rush fit into the roster? How about the personalities of these guys, and in particular, Andris Biedrins. Can we learn anything about them? (Hint: Sidney Lowe is no longer the only Jazzman with an iffy history with the tax man!) All that, plus a Paul Millsap and Al Jefferson retrospective, on this week’s show!

Author information

Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen
Andy Larsen is the Managing Editor of Salt City Hoops, the ESPN TrueHoop affiliate for the Utah Jazz. He also hosts a radio show and podcast every week on ESPN700 AM in Salt Lake City.
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http://saltcityhoops.com/salt-city-hoops-saturday-show-analyzing-the-biedrinsjeffersonrush-deal/feed/ 4 andris biedrins,brandon rush,richard jefferson,warriors trade On this week's show, Andy Larsen and Ben Gaines analyze the big trade with the Golden State Warriors, in which the Warriors sent Biedrins, Jefferson, Rush, two first rounders, and two second rounders to the Jazz in exchange for Kevin Murphy. On this week's show, Andy Larsen and Ben Gaines analyze the big trade with the Golden State Warriors, in which the Warriors sent Biedrins, Jefferson, Rush, two first rounders, and two second rounders to the Jazz in exchange for Kevin Murphy. There were significant financial costs to the deal, but was it worth it? Then, we invited Nate Parham of Golden State of Mind onto the show to learn a little bit more about the players received in the deal. Can Biedrins and Jefferson help the Jazz at all this season, or are they a lost cause? How does Brandon Rush fit into the roster? How about the personalities of these guys, and in particular, Andris Biedrins. Can we learn anything about them? (Hint: Sidney Lowe is no longer the only Jazzman with an iffy history with the tax man!) All that, plus a Paul Millsap and Al Jefferson retrospective, on this week's show! Salt City Hoops no 55:03